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What is AIS?

Added by Durlach, Paula 6 months ago

Short musings on AIS definition and old report on levels of adaptation for anyone who cares to look at it

What is AIS.docx - Short musings on AIS definition (16 KB)

FIT TR 1335.pdf - old report on levels of adaptation for anyone who cares to look at it (559 KB)


Replies (5)

RE: What is AIS? - Added by Durlach, Paula 6 months ago

Here is a definition provided by ENNOUAMANI and MAHANI. IJCSNS International Journal of Computer Science and Network Security, VOL.18 No.4, April 2018

the process of generating a unique learning experience for each learner based on the learner’s personality, interests and performance in order to achieve the learner academic improvement,
learner satisfaction, effective learning process and so forth

Here is a definition provided by Durlach & Spain (for adaptive instruction, whether automated or not)

training or education in which content, feedback, scaffolding, or support is tailored to an individual learner’s aptitudes, learning preferences, or styles, either before instruction, or in real-time during instruction, with the aim of enhancing learning outcomes

Here is a paraphrase of a definition I proposed in the AIS workshop

Provides content tailored to learner’s experience, knowledge, or other factors, in an effort to enhance learning and avoid boredom or frustration. Diagnoses learner weaknesses in mastery of domain content and/or other factors affecting learning (e.g., motivation), and makes instructional interventions aimed at repairing these.

Avatar?id=10&size=24x24 RE: What is AIS? - Added by Sottilare, Robert 5 months ago

Hi Paula... is the first definition specifically one for adaptive instructional systems or something else?

These are good definitions of adaptive instruction... with good keywords... training and education, recommendations, real-time guidance...

I would suggest we also need to think about how this definition will help us include/exclude systems from the category we are attempting to classify as adaptive instructional systems. Thoughts?

RE: What is AIS? - Added by Hampton, Andrew 5 months ago

I agree with Bob's focus on picking fringe cases for inclusion/exclusion. I think Paula's definition does a great job of including a range of AIS approaches, but I worry about exclusion. For example, an "adaptive" test like the computerized GRE gives harder questions following correct answers, and I believe we would argue against its inclusion in the AIS family. However, one could consider this type of test to be education (in the Dewey sense) because you're thinking about the problems. Following that, the definition's use of "or" could let an opportunistic designer choose the path of least resistance to minimally meet the requirements. Now it only needs to have content fit aptitude.

Paula gave a good exclusion example today on our telecon regarding AISs not including technologies whose goals never include performing the task without them. I think that is a strongly objective and perfectly logical distinction to make. I would argue for a similar bulwark at the lower end.

Perhaps we would do well to include some abstract mathematical component? We could argue that a true AIS should not have a number of instructional paths quantifiable by algebraic expression. I'm not a mathematician, but I believe this would easily be met by any system that consulted a learner model to update proximal interactions, or one that uses AI/machine learning.

RE: What is AIS? - Added by Lameier, Elizabeth 5 months ago

What is adaptive? Adaptive is a property that is both learner controlled through adaptability and system controlled through adaptivity in order to tailor instruction and recommendations based on the goals, needs, and preferences of each learner.

I think a great starting point would be to list the ways current and future AIS adapt, followed by a break down into further categories. I think the classification of these categories needs to remain simplified, such as no adaptation, minimal/basic adaptation, personalized /complex/ high adaptation. The discussion mentioned to potentially use IMI type scales. However, I agree if we have too many (5) then there will be gray areas. Regardless, I think we will run into areas that may fall into two categories depending on the use. For example, for Feedback you said providing the correct answer was not adaptive. However, it depends how it is applied. Perhaps it could be adaptive if three in a row wrong with only right/wrong feedback (formative assessment) provided an intervention on that sub-task, or practice in the area the learner is having misconceptions. However, it might be none if it does nothing. So maybe add a column on the different outcomes and then divide them into none, minimal, and high(or what ever terms we want to use)?

RE: What is AIS? - Added by Durlach, Paula 5 months ago

RE: Perhaps we would do well to include some abstract mathematical component? We could argue that a true AIS should not have a number of instructional paths quantifiable by algebraic expression. I'm not a mathematician, but I believe this would easily be met by any system that consulted a learner model to update proximal interactions, or one that uses AI/machine learning.

Is this confusing I for Instructional with I for Intelligent?

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